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One Hit ... And Much More
2004-12-01 00:19
by Jon Weisman
Note: The Dodger Thoughts blog has moved to the Los Angeles Times.

Sad story by Mike McFeely in The Forum of Fargo-Grand Forks, North Dakota on the death of 37-year-old Brian Traxler, who got his only major league hit, a pinch-hit double, with the Dodgers in 1990:

Brian Traxler was a 5-foot-11, 250-pound Texan who wore a cowboy hat and the boots to match. His belly belonged on a slowpitch softball field instead of a professional baseball diamond. He liked to have fun and made no apologies for that character strength, once telling former Forum sports columnist Dave Kolpack, "I like to have a few beers once in awhile and I eat what I want to eat."

Those traits -- plus an uncanny knack for hitting line drives -- made Traxler the first bona fide fan favorite of the Fargo-Moorhead RedHawks. ... All of which made it that much harder for many in the RedHawks organization when they received news Nov. 19 that Traxler had died in his hometown of San Antonio.

A cause of death has not been released, but it's known that Traxler had been ill just a short time. He was in a coma for about two weeks prior to his death.

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