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Sending Out an SbS
2003-04-02 20:25
by Jon Weisman
Note: The Dodger Thoughts blog has moved to the Los Angeles Times.

Kevin Brown's first six innings Wednesday, pitch-by-pitch:

Inning 1: SbS bSSbS SSS
Inning 2: S SSbbSS SS
Inning 3: bSbSbS bS SSS SbbSbS
Inning 4: SbS S SbS
Inning 5: bSbSS SbS bbbS
Inning 6: bS bbS bbSb

As the game went on, Brown stopped getting the first-pitch strikes that he was racking up earlier. But what a fine performance nonetheless. He faced one batter over the minimum over six innings, and used three pitches or fewer on 13 out of 19 batters.

Meanwhile, Eric Gagne comes in for his first appearance and retires the side on nine pitches - all strikes.

The Dodgers needed only 342 pitches to get through the 28 1/3 innings of this series. That's 12.1 pitches per inning. Phenomenal.

Of course, as any oldtimer will tell you, 342 pitches is nothing. In the old days, a pitcher would throw 342 pitches in a game by himself. In the blazing sun. Nursing a hangover from nightcrawling past 3 a.m. at the downtown speakeasy. With wolves biting at their ankles. And don't forget - they traveled by train back then. Long hours through mudflap towns. In fact, sometimes those roadtrips were so long, they played the games on the trains. You ever tried to hit a curveball from Lefty Grove while a speeding locomotive shot you through a tunnel in Appalachia? I didn't think so. So don't go bragging to me about no 342 pitches.

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