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About Jon
Thank You For Not ...

1) using profanity or any euphemisms for profanity
2) personally attacking other commenters
3) baiting other commenters
4) arguing for the sake of arguing
5) discussing politics
6) using hyperbole when something less will suffice
7) using sarcasm in a way that can be misinterpreted negatively
8) making the same point over and over again
9) typing "no-hitter" or "perfect game" to describe either in progress
10) being annoyed by the existence of this list
11) commenting under the obvious influence
12) claiming your opinion isn't allowed when it's just being disagreed with

Best Wishes, Dioner
2007-03-05 12:54
by Jon Weisman
Note: The Dodger Thoughts blog has moved to the Los Angeles Times.

From Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times:

It would seem Dioner Navarro has been through enough.

There was the medically miraculous saga involving wife Sherley's recovery from a 2003 brain aneurysm. The frightening hit-and-run auto accident he and his family were involved in shortly after being acquired by the Devil Rays during the summer. The surgery his infant son had in September to remove his left kidney, forcing the Devil Rays catcher to miss the last week of the season.

Now as Navarro, 23, prepares for what he hopes will be the season he establishes himself as a full-time and frontline major-leaguer, he faces another family medical concern.

Dioner Jr., now 19 months old, needs another operation to correct problems with his urethra and remaining kidney. The surgery was supposed to be performed last month but had to be delayed when he developed severe ear and respiratory infections. The family is hoping he is well enough to have it done this month so Navarro doesn't miss any regular-season games.

"It's been kind of tough," Navarro said. "This is my No. 1 priority: When I get here to the field I know it's my job and I have to put that in the back. But he is my son. I know he'll be fine. His mama is taking care of him. I just think positively the whole time. I just stay focused on being positive, and everything is going to be fine."

Comments (79)
Show/Hide Comments 1-50
2007-03-05 13:10:29
1.   Benaiah
He was pretty good when he played for us. His OPS was 95% of the league average, which is probably above average production for a catcher. I hope things turn around for him.
2007-03-05 13:32:00
2.   old dodger fan
How does he even think about baseball? Thoughts and prayers are with him and his family. Jon, thanks for this post.
2007-03-05 13:43:08
3.   returnoffernandomania
Great post Jon. Never thought that Navarro was the real deal, but as a person who has been through the ringer with family health, I fully respect his ability to try to perform to his uypmost capability. The guy has heart.
2007-03-05 13:45:24
4.   Benaiah
1 - Rereading my post, it seems callous in the context of this thread. Things like this are so much more important than baseball that it can make you feel silly for caring so much about a game where grown men hit a ball with a stick. Fortunately that same game distracts me from my embarrassment. Good luck Dioner, you're due for some.
2007-03-05 13:56:17
5.   Xeifrank
My heart goes out to Dioner, his wife and especially to his little one. It's difficult to watch your small child be sick or in this case have major surgeries. I have had some close calls with my little one, but nothing as bad as this. Just a reminder that baseball is secondary to the more important things in life, like health. Hopefully, in the not too far off future Dioner's little one can put on a mit and accompany his dad to work. :)
vr, Xei
2007-03-05 14:09:39
6.   trainwreck
Hope for the best for Dioner. That poor kid has had to go through a lot already.
2007-03-05 14:14:08
7.   Sam DC
Benaiah: For what it's worth, I thought your comment was perfectly appropriate and supportive of Navarro. He's still playing ball and nothing wrong at all with weighing in on that side of things as well the other.
2007-03-05 14:22:45
8.   Jon Weisman
7 - I agree.
2007-03-05 14:30:00
9.   Benaiah
7,8 - Thanks. I just kind of felt like I missed the point.
2007-03-05 15:12:44
10.   bhsportsguy
All the best to Dionner and his family.

Here's another great Grady quote.

Little turned 57 on Saturday but wasn't planning to do much by way of a celebration. All he had on his agenda was dinner with broadcaster Charlie Steiner. "I'm getting as far away from celebrating as I can get," Little said jokingly. "I'm having dinner with Charlie, so that's probably anti-celebrating."

2007-03-05 15:51:47
11.   Gold Star for Robot Boy
10 - Grady is one of the funnier managers around.
2007-03-05 16:56:44
12.   rubdawg
Benaiah,

I rarely post but I am here daily. I agree with Sam DC but what you wrote in #4 was sheer class. Have a great season. Go Blue!

2007-03-05 17:13:43
13.   Dave
Best wishes to the three of you Dioner. There's nothing much harder than trying to do your very best when you're distracted by concerns for your children's health. This is one Dodger fan rooting especially hard for you.

Thanks for letting us know Jon. -Dave

2007-03-05 17:52:05
14.   El Lay Dave
I'm pulling for Dioner and family. I'm a father, but I can't even imagine what he has to go through every day, since I have not ever been challenged in life to that sort of extent.
2007-03-05 17:54:11
15.   natepurcell
dont want to overreact, but i think beimels going to be a TJer soon.

http://tinyurl.com/2aexht

2007-03-05 17:59:20
16.   Greg Brock
Dodgers - Beimel = Greg Miller?
2007-03-05 18:03:52
17.   natepurcell
16

more like matt white if the dodgers feel miller needs to be stretched out as a starter in AAA.

2007-03-05 18:05:18
18.   Sam DC
So that article Nate linked has some comments by DJ on the whole opt out thing. Why do so many people have such trouble letting things lie. It really seemed to have mostly blown over and here he is stirring things up with talk of no-trade clauses and indignation about being accused of having gone back on his word and etc. What does he think he's accomplishing?
2007-03-05 18:08:30
19.   Greg Brock
Could this be UC Santa Clara's last shot at an NCAA Tournament birth before Steve Lavin comes in to demolish the program?

WCC Championship game on ESPN.

2007-03-05 18:08:38
20.   Blue Crew
Will definitely keep Dioner and his family in my thoughts and prayers. Hopefully, 2007 will be the beginning for a healthier Navarro family.

BC

2007-03-05 18:09:04
21.   D4P
18
To be fair, I'm guessing Drew was asked about it; I don't think he called a press conference to discuss the matter on his own...
2007-03-05 18:14:30
22.   Sam DC
21 Well, that's a good point. Though "I'm not gonna get into it" would have still been an option.

I just find myself, as a fan of his and someone who very much understood the choice he made and thought Colletti was out of line, turning off when he gets all in a huff about his "integrity" being threatened. I mean, as much as I don't blame him, he did make those pretty strong comments about the idea of staying in LA in the papers and so I think he just ought not get on a high horse about the whole thing.

2007-03-05 18:16:00
23.   underdog
19 Did I miss Santa Clara becoming a public school? ;-) But all kidding aside, it's hard not to root for Dick Davey given his semi-forced retirement. They've been so much better than expected this year. The Big West tourney should also be interesting this year. 3-4 fairly equal teams but only one will probably get into the tourney.
2007-03-05 18:16:37
24.   underdog
Btw, my thoughts and prayers are also with Navarro and his family - hope they can get through this. Sports do indeed seem rather insignificant at times like that.
2007-03-05 18:18:48
25.   Greg Brock
23 Wow....I need a nap.
2007-03-05 18:19:14
26.   underdog
Yikes, re: Beimel. So is "mushiness" the medical term for the first sign of blown-out elbow?

--
I sort of chuckled at this quote in that same story, from Randy Wolf. "I should feel nothing. And I do," he said. That's technically grammatically correct but something sounds off about it. And it doesn't.

2007-03-05 18:30:55
27.   Bob Timmermann
Interesting that the WCC semifinals were on ESPN, while the Pac-10 tournament will be seen by only people with the proper Fox regional network, with the exception of the final.

I remember all the Jesuits who taught me at UCLA. They were on leave from UC Santa Clara.

2007-03-05 18:33:59
28.   Greg Brock
27 No fair piling on. Tired man make post bad.
2007-03-05 18:35:45
29.   El Lay Dave
27 Jerry Brown arranged that.
2007-03-05 18:36:36
30.   Greg Brock
The worst part was knowing that Bob was out there, waiting, plotting...

The wait seemed like an eternity.

2007-03-05 18:37:19
31.   El Lay Dave
28 On top of that, for Santa Clara, the U. comes last, not first. Santa Clara University. USC paid SCU in palm trees to rename themselves.
2007-03-05 18:38:57
32.   Greg Brock
I typed it really fast! Four hours of sleep! Leave me alone!

{fetal position}

2007-03-05 18:40:08
33.   El Lay Dave
(from the last, now dormant topic, but resurrected here, because I'm so full of myself at the moment, although I'm sure Steve will be by any minute to deflate my ego back to normal.)

22 Speaking of roses by other names, is there any difference between "opt-out" and "player option"? J. D. Drew, in essence, elected not to exercise his option on the rest of the contract. Teams frequently choose not to exercise their option on a player's contract. Player's agents, however, are smart enough to realize that there is value there and negotiate a cost to the team if they choose not to exercise their option. So why was J. D. Drew's opt-out/option free ? (Sure, he would have left anyway, but at least he'd provide some of LuGo's inflated salary.)

2007-03-05 18:40:42
34.   El Lay Dave
34 {begins spinning James Taylor CD}
2007-03-05 18:40:55
35.   El Lay Dave
er... 32...
2007-03-05 18:42:19
36.   Greg Brock
35 Ha! Get your numbers right, buddy!

Everybody...Look at the man! Look at the man with the wrong links!

2007-03-05 18:43:57
37.   Greg Brock
I am so petty :-(
2007-03-05 18:46:33
38.   Sam DC
33 I think an opt out and a player option are the same thing.

And I don't think it's uncommon that, when the option runs to the player, the player doesn't have to pay if he exercises it (even though teams often have to pay if they decline to exercise). Because money only runs one way in these deals.

But I don't think that makes it "free." It's part of the overall deal. Maybe the Dodgers got the out years cheaper because they agreed to the option, and both sides took risk in the deal so constructed. Or maybe the overall salary was slightly lower than it would have been w.o the option/opt-out.

2007-03-05 19:04:38
39.   StolenMonkey86
I wish Dioner the best.
2007-03-05 19:08:20
40.   Icaros
Hey, I don't know if anyone noticed, but I'm almost certain that Santa Clara isn't a UC.
2007-03-05 19:08:38
41.   underdog
Wow. This'll make poor Greg feel better. Check out the latest Google News on the Dodgers (click Jon's link at right) - the wire services spread the news that the Red Sox had beaten the Dodgers today instead of vice versa. Luckily for them it's a meaningless spring training game or... or... I don't know what! Sumthin'! {{Snort!}}
2007-03-05 19:17:17
42.   El Lay Dave
38 That's my point. There's no difference, but with Drew the "opt-out" terminology is used, which seems a little more negative, somewhat implying backing out of a deal.

If money really only runs one way, then the union has far better negotiators than the owners.

Your last paragraph is a point well-taken. I suppose we'll never know what the quid pro quo was for the option/opt-out, if there was one. Unless DePo is going to start talking. (I don't recall anyone thinking at the time that Drew's 5-year, $55 million was at all undervalued, though.)

2007-03-05 19:37:49
43.   Bob Timmermann
Dick Davey has some odd sweaters. And his wife has some odd hair.
2007-03-05 19:39:40
44.   underdog
43 She could use some more makeup though. (Ahem. Cough.)
2007-03-05 19:43:34
45.   StolenMonkey86
I think the glossy pages misled Drew and convinced him he'd be trade bait. Honestly, the only Drew trades I can think of that would have made sense would have been sending him to Cincy for Dunn or to Detroit for Thames and/or Monroe, and those trades wouldn't be but so probable.
2007-03-05 19:46:05
46.   Steve
Why would we need a quid pro quo when the opt out was so lopsidedly in our favor?
2007-03-05 19:46:23
47.   Greg Brock
40 Hate you.
2007-03-05 19:55:11
48.   Andrew Shimmin
Nate Silver, the mad scientist behind PECOTA, had a very interesting post on the BP blog, Unfiltered, today. He alluded to this in a chat, earlier this year, but it's something I didn't know: pitchers don't age in anything like the way hitters do. Hitters tend to get better as they age, till they level off around 28. But pitchers usually don't.

http://baseballprospectus.com/unfiltered/?p=249

I'd like to see much more about this, but it would change the way I think about the liquidation of Edwin Jackson and Chuck Tiffany (if not the wages of that liquidation). I wonder what Nate and Repent of Burn think about it.

2007-03-05 20:09:02
49.   El Lay Dave
48 More fuel for the Billingsley and K/Guo fire. So is the new rule of thumb going to be, young hitters are to be carefully managed so the team can still afford them at their peak, but young pitchers, smoke 'em if you got 'em?
2007-03-05 20:10:05
50.   El Lay Dave
46 Sure, just look what Ned did with the found money.
Show/Hide Comments 51-100
2007-03-05 20:11:04
51.   D4P
Sounds like pitchers are like Priuses: they've only got a certain number of miles in them, so don't waste them in the minor leagues or on trips to Walmart.
2007-03-05 20:11:09
52.   Bob Timmermann
Rick Majerus treated Dick Davey's last game at Santa Clara (which this probably wasn't as I bet they go to the NIT) like it was the passing of a coaching giant along the line of Clair Bee.
2007-03-05 20:20:10
53.   Bob Timmermann
Pitchers don't have as many cupholders as a Prius.
2007-03-05 20:21:45
54.   D4P
Pitchers don't have as many cupholders as a Prius

Who needs a cup(holder) when you can drink straight from the pitcher...?

2007-03-05 20:22:48
55.   Steve
If Juan Pierre had such an opt-out, it would be as God's rainbows smiling upon the peasant children of 19th Century Victorian England.
2007-03-05 20:25:10
56.   Greg Brock
On a more pragmatic note, you should ride all your talented young players as hard as you can. The overwhelming odds dictate that they're going to the highest bidder once they hit free agency, so why not just flog the thoroughbred until he leaves?

It's like Ryan Howard. Why should the Phillies give him a monster contract when they control his rights through his prime, he'll be 31 when he's a free agent, and other teams will overpay for his decline? They shouldn't

If there was any loyalty left in sport, maybe I'd feel differently. But there isn't, and I don't.

2007-03-05 20:27:51
57.   Greg Brock
As a caveat, I'm not saying that you abuse young pitchers, ala Mark Prior. I'm just saying that young players have great value, and you should maximize that value while you have the chance.

Do you thing Billy Beane weeps over Mulder and Hudson's recent health problems? I highly doubt it.

2007-03-05 20:29:54
58.   Andrew Shimmin
Bud Black, leader of men:

http://tinyurl.com/2o59ze (second item)

2007-03-05 20:34:39
59.   Bob Timmermann
Billy Beane is a computer and unable to shed tears.
2007-03-05 20:37:48
60.   CanuckDodger
48 -- Andrew, I think Silver's position is much more nuanced than you represent it as being. And note that he said that a particular category of pitching prospects "tend to improve more often than not" -- pitchers "with good stuff, high K rates, and highish walk rates." This special "category" is practically synonymous with top Dodger pitching prospects, and that includes Edwin Jackson and Chuck Tiffany (when we had them). So, basically, Mark Alexander is about our only pitching prospect whom you can say is about as good as he will ever be (which is why the Dodgers probably don't take him seriously enough to have bothered to invite him to big league spring training).
2007-03-05 20:47:03
61.   Steve
Does this mean Mark Hendrickson's not going to get better?
2007-03-05 20:48:43
62.   Andrew Shimmin
No doubt his position is much more nuanced than I presented it as being. I expect it's more nuanced than he himself was able to relate in a relatively short blog post. He promised more on the subject, and I'm looking forward to it.

The Kevin Goldstein piece today said that EJ's fastball is sitting between 92-97, which, (a) seems like a wide variance and, (b) makes me a little sick to my stomach. Wasn't the biggest problem with him that he'd lost speed?

http://tinyurl.com/2p5zrr

2007-03-05 20:50:19
63.   Steve
The problem with Edwin Jackson is that he has as many pitches as the middle reliever he was traded for.
2007-03-05 20:53:53
64.   Greg Brock
Teaching Edwin Jackson a changeup or an effective splitter would have gone a long way. Instead, we decided to give up on a 22 year old kid with a great arm and fluid mechanics. He didn't have command, which means you totally bail on him (because he was so old and all).
2007-03-05 20:54:38
65.   Icaros
61

Be patient. He traded his ologist for an iatrist after that last outing.

Once the Prozac works its way deep into his roots and branches (early June), he's going to be lights out.

2007-03-05 20:56:33
66.   D4P
65
Maybe he needs to try an analrapist...
2007-03-05 20:57:09
67.   Steve
This topic will just dredge up all the old, stupid excuses, so I choose to change it.

Did you hear about the UCLA grad who had to steal his first three answers from the fifth-graders, then quit on the fourth question? I wonder if that's on You Tube.

2007-03-05 20:57:36
68.   Greg Brock
66 He means Analyst/Therapist, for the uninitiated.

You really need to clarify that...

2007-03-05 21:00:50
69.   trainwreck
68
Its their fault for being uninitiated.
2007-03-05 21:01:31
70.   trainwreck
Only the show that overtime has probably gotten talked about the most here.
2007-03-05 21:04:16
71.   underdog
58 Kevin Kouzmanoff, player voted most likely to end up on the 60-day DL with 2nd degree burns.
2007-03-05 21:04:17
72.   trainwreck
Besides, it just adds to the D4P mystique.
2007-03-05 21:06:07
73.   trainwreck
Besides, it just adds to the D4P mystique.
2007-03-05 21:06:33
74.   trainwreck
Now my browser is just going crazy.
2007-03-05 21:06:54
75.   Jon Weisman
This chat may stop
New post up top
A whole new crop
Of words to mop
A line I'll drop:
Your bubble may pop
I'll play the fop
New post up top
2007-03-05 21:08:17
76.   Greg Brock
Underdog breaks up trainwreck posting for the cycle...

Boooo!

2007-03-05 21:11:26
77.   D4P
Underdog breaks up trainwreck posting for the cycle...

And the broken cycle was D4P-centric...

BOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!

2007-03-05 21:16:16
78.   Andrew Shimmin
71- You have to hope that whoever wrote his renters' insurance policy doesn't read the newspaper.
2007-03-05 22:09:58
79.   underdog
77 Sorry! I had no idea such a streak was going there. Someone should have doused my tale of pyromania.

75 Why does that sound like the song to some Jay Ward cartoon?

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